How Long Does it Take for DNS to Propagate?

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KristinaW

KristinaW

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A few days ago I moved my website to a new host. I have my domain name registered through GoDaddy and I logged in and changed my nameserver setting to point to the new server where my website is being hosted. Not long after I made that change, I was able to see the website on the new server while browsing in FireFox, but I couldn't see the site in Chrome or in Microsoft Edge. What's going on? How long does it take for the change to take full effect?
 
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KodyWallice

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KristinaW said:
A few days ago I moved my website to a new host. I have my domain name registered through GoDaddy and I logged in and changed my nameserver setting to point to the new server where my website is being hosted. Not long after I made that change, I was able to see the website on the new server while browsing in FireFox, but I couldn't see the site in Chrome or in Microsoft Edge. What's going on? How long does it take for the change to take full effect?
The experts say it can take up to 72 hours for a domain to fully propagate the internet. I'm no pro and I honestly don't know what the internal workings are, but if you're interested, you can read all about it here:

https://ns1.com/resources/dns-propagation

I have experienced a sort of staggered propagation during my days dealing with websites though. I know that some service providers are faster than others when it comes to propagation. For example, I have changed hosting companies like you have and have called friends across the country to see if they could see the site. They could while I still could not. That's the way it works. After the full 72 hours though, I have never had a problem. The website always eventually changes over.

I've never experienced what you're referring to though, where you can see a website in one browser while you can't see it in another. You may need to flush what they call a "DNS cache." Kinsta has a great article on DNS caching and why it's necessary. You can read it here:

https://kinsta.com/knowledgebase/flush-dns/

They also have a video that covers how to can flush your operating system's (Windows, Mac) cache as well as your browser's (Chrome) DNS cache.


If you don't want to read the entire article, I'll explain the short version to you. Basically, both operating systems and browsers have databases that hold DNS information for every website a person visits. The reason for this is because if they didn't hold this information, they'd have to access servers on the internet to acquire the same information, every single time you visit any website. Since most people access the same websites over and over again, it's faster and more efficient to store the information regarding where the website is hosted right on a person's computer. There's no need to access remote servers if the info is stored locally.

Problems arise when people change the nameservers (DNS) for their website though. In your case, you changed the nameserver information from one server to another. That's fine, but according to your operating system and Chrome, your site is still back at the old server. I believe it takes up to 48 hours for these caches to clear and for your computer or phone and browser to revisit the domain name server on the internet to update to the website's new address.

People say you can clear the DNS cache for both computers as well as operating systems. I've never had this work for me, but people out there say it works. Here are the instructions:

How to Clear DNS Cache in Google Chrome​


1. Open Chrome.

2. Copy and paste this into the address bar and hit the Enter key on your keyboard: chrome://net-internals/#dns

3. When you see the Clear Host Cache button, click on it.

chrome-clear-host-cache.gif

Doing this should clear the cache inside of Google Chrome.

How to Clear DNS Cache in Windows​


1. Press the Start button on your computer and then navigate to the Command Prompt option under Windows System.

windows-command-prompt.gif

2. When you see the command prompt, type this in: ipconfig /flushdns.

3. Press the Enter key on your keyboard to complete the command.

Doing this should flush the DNS cache on your Windows 10 machine.

There are many other operating systems and browsers that you can flush the cache in, such as Linux, Mac, and Windows 8, but I decided to leave it at these two because they're so popular. If you need further instructions, please let me know.
 
How Long Does it Take for DNS to Propagate? was posted on 05-07-2021 by KristinaW in the Servers & Hosting forum.
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